Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry, 1930-1950

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University of New Mexico Press #ad - Particularly useful to readers interested in women's history, labor history, or Mexican-American culture. Journal of the southwest"i know of no more vivid or more convincing portrait of women's work culture than in Cannery Women, Cannery Lives. These rank-and-file activists skillfully managed union affairs, company-provided day care, including negotiating such benefits as maternity leave, and paid vacations--in some cases better benefits than they enjoy today.

Out of the labor militancy of the 1930s emerged the United Cannery, Packing, Agricultural, and Allied Workers of America UCAPAWA. Pacific historical review "cannery Women, enhances our understanding of labor politics, Mexican women's lives, Cannery Lives, and immigrant family history. Women have been the mainstay of the grueling, seasonal canning industry for over a century.

Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry, 1930-1950 #ad - . Labor history. But by 1951, ucapawa lay in ruins--a victim of red baiting in the McCarthy era and of brutal takeover tactics by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters. Acclaim"cannery women, cannery Lives, is a welcome addition to U.

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They Called It Prairie Light: The Story of Chilocco Indian School North American Indian Prose Award

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University of Nebraska Press #ad - Established in 1884 and operative for nearly a century, the Chilocco Indian School in Oklahoma was one of a series of off-reservation boarding schools intended to assimilate American Indian children into mainstream American life. Tsianina Lomawaima discloses was much more complex. Lomawaima allows the Chilocco students to speak for themselves.

Critics have characterized the schools as destroyers of Indian communities and cultures, but the reality that K. In recollections juxtaposed against the official records of racist ideology and repressive practice, students from the 1920s and 1930s recall their loneliness and demoralization but also remember with pride the love and mutual support binding them together—the forging of new pan-Indian identities and reinforcement of old tribal ones.

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Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - Nobody eber helps me into carriages, or ober mud-puddles. No one who reads painter's groundbreaking biography will forget this landmark figure and the story of her courageous life. As an abolitionist and a feminist, truth defied the notion that slaves were male and women were white, expounding a fact that still bears repeating: among blacks there are women; among women, there are blacks.

No one who heard her speak ever forgot Sojourner Truth, the power and pathos of her voice, and the intelligence of her message. And ar'n't i a woman?"sojourner truth: ex-slave and fiery abolitionist, figure of imposing physique, riveting preacher and spellbinding singer who dazzled listeners with her wit and originality.

Sojourner Truth: A Life, A Symbol #ad - A monumental biography of one of the most important black women of the nineteenth century. Sojourner truth first gained prominence at an 1851 Akron, women's rights conference, "Dat man over dar say dat woman needs to be helped into carriages, saying, Ohio, and lifted over ditches. Straight-talking and unsentimental, Truth became a national symbol for strong black women--indeed, for all strong women.

Inspired by religion, truth transformed herself from a domestic servant named Isabella into an itinerant pentecostal preacher; her words of empowerment have inspired black women and poor people the world over to this day.

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Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation

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St. Martin's Press #ad - In a post-civil rights era defined by deindustrialization and globalization, polycultural generation's worldview, hip-hop crystallized a multiracial, and transformed American politics and culture. But that epic story has never been told with this kind of breadth, insight, and style. Based on original interviews with djs, the music, and gang members, including dj kool herc, with unforgettable portraits of many of hip-hop's forebears, Chuck D, founders, activists, and mavericks, Afrika Bambaataa, the ideas, and Ice Cube, Can't Stop Won't Stop chronicles the events, rappers, graffiti writers, b-boys, and the art that marked the hip-hop generation's rise from the ashes of the 60's into the new millennium.

Can't stop won't stop is a powerful cultural and social history of the end of the American century, and a provocative look into the new world that the hip-hop generation created. Forged in the fires of the bronx and Kingston, Jamaica, hip-hop became the Esperanto of youth rebellion and a generation-defining movement.

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Quiet Odyssey: A Pioneer Korean Woman in America Classics of Asian American Literature

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University of Washington Press #ad - Lee recounts racism on the playground and the ravages of mercury mining on her father’s health, but also entrepreneurial successes and hardships surmounted with grace. With a new foreword by David K. They shared the poverty-stricken existence endured by thousands of Asian immigrants in the early twentieth century, cooks, working as farm laborers, janitors, and miners.

. The volume includes thirty illustrations and a comprehensive introduction and bibliographic essay by respected scholar Sucheng Chan, who collaborated closely with Lee to edit the biography and ensure the work was true to the author’s intended vision. Her father worked in the sugar plantations of Hawaii briefly before taking his family to California.

Quiet Odyssey: A Pioneer Korean Woman in America Classics of Asian American Literature #ad - Yoo, this edition reintroduces Quiet Odyssey to readers interested in Asian American history and immigration studies. This award-winning book provides a compelling firsthand account of early Korean American history and continues to be an essential work in Asian American studies. Mary paik lee left her native country in 1905, traveling with her parents as a political refugee after Japan imposed control over Korea.

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Mrs. Packard

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Theatre Communications Group #ad - Based on historical events, emily mann’s play tells of one woman’s struggle to right a system gone wrong in this winner of the Kennedy Center Fund for New American Plays Award. Emily mann is a playwright and director, now in her nineteenth season as artistic director of McCarter Theatre. Emily mann is one of our most urgently engaging, provocative and significant American playwrights.

Joyce carol oates“Elizabeth Packard emerges as a vibrant, passionate force of nature. The new york timesillinois, 1861: Without proof of insanity, Elizabeth Packard is committed by her husband to an asylum. Her award-winning plays have been produced throughout the world.

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Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised Edition

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - One of those rare books that quickly became the standard work in its field. Anne firor scott, duke universityliving with the dual burdens of racism and sexism, slave women in the plantation South assumed roles within the family and community that contrasted sharply with traditional female roles in the larger American society.

This revised edition of ar'n't i a woman? reviews and updates the scholarship on slave women and the slave family, exploring new ways of understanding the intersection of race and gender and comparing the myths that stereotyped female slaves with the realities of their lives. Above all, hold their families together, resist economic and sexual oppression, this groundbreaking study shows us how black women experienced freedom in the Reconstruction South—their heroic struggle to gain their rights, and maintain their sense of womanhood against all odds.

Ar'n't I a Woman?: Female Slaves in the Plantation South Revised Edition #ad - Winner of the letitia woods Brown Memorial Book Prize awarded by the Association of Black Women Historians.

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Entering the Picture: Judy Chicago, The Fresno Feminist Art Program, and the Collective Visions of Women Artists New Directions in American History

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Routledge #ad - Articles on topics such as african american artists in new york and los Angeles, San Francisco’s Las Mujeres Muralistas and Asian American Women Artists Association, and exhibitions in Taiwan and Italy showcase the artistic trajectories that destabilized traditional theories and practices and reshaped the art world.

An engaging editor’s introduction explains how feminist art emerged within the powerful women’s movement that transformed America. Entering the picture is an exciting collection about the provocative contributions of feminists to American art. Collaborative work and performance art – including the famous "Cunt Cheerleaders" – were program hallmarks.

Entering the Picture: Judy Chicago, The Fresno Feminist Art Program, and the Collective Visions of Women Artists New Directions in American History #ad - Drawing upon the consciousness-raising techniques of the women's liberation movement, they created shocking new art forms depicting female experiences. In 1970, judy chicago and fifteen students founded the groundbreaking Feminist Art Program FAP at Fresno State. Augmented by thirty-seven illustrations and color plates, many of whom were eye witnesses to landmark events, this interdisciplinary collection of essays by artists and scholars, relates how feminists produced vibrant bodies of art in Fresno and other locales where similar collaborations flourished.

Moving to los angeles, the FAP produced the first major feminist art installation, Womanhouse 1972.

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Lieutenant Nun: Memoir of a Basque Transvestite in the New World

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Beacon Press #ad - This delightful translation of Catalina's own work introduces a new audience to her audacious escapades. A soldier in the spanish army, she traveled to Peru and Chile, became a gambler, and even mistakenly killed her own brother in a duel. One of the earliest known autobiographies by a woman, this is the extraordinary tale of Catalina de Erauso, who in 1599 escaped from a Basque convent dressed as a man and went on to live one of the most wildly fantastic lives of any woman in history.

During her lifetime she emerged as the adored folkloric hero of the Spanish-speaking world.

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Garbage In The Cities: Refuse Reform and the Environment Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ

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University of Pittsburgh Press #ad - It also offers a discussion of the reception of the first edition, and an examination of the ways solid waste management has become more federally regulated in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Melosi traces the rise of sanitation engineering, accurately describes the scope and changing nature of the refuse problem in U.

S. This thoroughly revised and updated edition includes two new chapters that expand the discussion of developments since World War I. Cities, reveals the sometimes hidden connections between industrialization and pollution, and discusses the social agendas behind many early cleanliness programs. Absolutely essential reading for historians, and sociologists, policy analysts, Garbage in the Cities offers a vibrant and insightful analysis of this fascinating topic.

Garbage In The Cities: Refuse Reform and the Environment Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ #ad - As recently as the 1880s, most american cities had no effective means of collecting and removing the mountains of garbage, refuse, and manure-over a thousand tons a day in New York City alone-that clogged streets and overwhelmed the senses of residents. In his landmark study, garbage in the Cities, Martin Melosi offered the first history of efforts begun in the Progressive Era to clean up this mess.

Since it was first published, Garbage in the Cities has remained one of the best historical treatments of the subject.

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Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - For the 380, 000 african american soldiers who fought in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's charge to make the world "safe for democracy" carried life-or-death meaning. Using a diverse range of sources, torchbearers of democracy reclaims the legacy of African American soldiers and veterans and connects their history to issues such as the obligations of citizenship, diaspora and internationalism, homecoming and racial violence, combat and labor, "New Negro" militancy, and African American memories of the war.

Williams reveals the central role of African American soldiers in the global conflict and how they, along with race activists and ordinary citizens, committed to fighting for democracy at home and beyond. Chad L.

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