Torchbearers of Democracy: African American Soldiers in the World War I Era The John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture

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The University of North Carolina Press #ad - Chad L. For the 380, 000 african american soldiers who fought in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's charge to make the world "safe for democracy" carried life-or-death meaning. Using a diverse range of sources, homecoming and racial violence, diaspora and internationalism, Torchbearers of Democracy reclaims the legacy of African American soldiers and veterans and connects their history to issues such as the obligations of citizenship, "New Negro" militancy, combat and labor, and African American memories of the war.

. Williams reveals the central role of African American soldiers in the global conflict and how they, along with race activists and ordinary citizens, committed to fighting for democracy at home and beyond.

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Freedom Struggles

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Harvard University Press #ad - They returned home to join activists working to make that world real. For many of the 200, 000 black soldiers sent to europe with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I, encounters with French civilians and colonial African troops led them to imagine a world beyond Jim Crow. In narrating the efforts of african american soldiers and activists to gain full citizenship rights as recompense for military service, Adriane Lentz-Smith illuminates how World War I mobilized a generation.

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Garbage In The Cities: Refuse Reform and the Environment Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ

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University of Pittsburgh Press #ad - Absolutely essential reading for historians, policy analysts, and sociologists, Garbage in the Cities offers a vibrant and insightful analysis of this fascinating topic. In his landmark study, garbage in the Cities, Martin Melosi offered the first history of efforts begun in the Progressive Era to clean up this mess.

Since it was first published, Garbage in the Cities has remained one of the best historical treatments of the subject. Cities, reveals the sometimes hidden connections between industrialization and pollution, and discusses the social agendas behind many early cleanliness programs. This thoroughly revised and updated edition includes two new chapters that expand the discussion of developments since World War I.

Garbage In The Cities: Refuse Reform and the Environment Pittsburgh Hist Urban Environ #ad - It also offers a discussion of the reception of the first edition, and an examination of the ways solid waste management has become more federally regulated in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Melosi traces the rise of sanitation engineering, accurately describes the scope and changing nature of the refuse problem in U.

S. As recently as the 1880s, most american cities had no effective means of collecting and removing the mountains of garbage, refuse, and manure-over a thousand tons a day in New York City alone-that clogged streets and overwhelmed the senses of residents.

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15th Anniversary Edition - The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction

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Oxford University Press #ad - The teeming nineteenth-century South comes to life in these pages. When this book first appeared in 1992, it won a broad array of prizes and was a finalist for both the National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. He explores every aspect of society, politics, and the economy, detailing the importance of each in the emerging New South.

Ayers takes us from remote southern towns, trapped into growing nothing but cotton, to the statehouses where Democratic Redeemers swept away the legacy of Reconstruction; from the small farmers, revolutionized by the spread of the railroads, to the new industries of Birmingham; from abuse and intimacy in the family to tumultuous public meetings of the prohibitionists.

The atlantic called it "one of the broadest and most original interpretations of southern history of the past twenty years. In this story, genteel picnics and mob violence, with its blend of new technology and old hatreds, Edward Ayers captures the history of the South in the years between Reconstruction and the turn of the century.

15th Anniversary Edition - The Promise of the New South: Life After Reconstruction #ad - Ranging from the georgia coast to the Tennessee mountains, from the power brokers to tenant farmers, Ayers depicts a land of startling contrasts. Central to the entire story is the role of race relations, from alliances and friendships between blacks and whites to the spread of Jim Crows laws and disfranchisement.

The citation for the national book Award declared Promise of the New South a vivid and masterfully detailed picture of the evolution of a new society. He eagerly listened as the soundman placed the needle down, only to find that through the tubes he held to his ears came the chilling sounds of a lynching.

At a public picnic in the south in the 1890s, a young man paid five cents for his first chance to hear the revolutionary Edison talking machine.

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We Return Fighting: World War I and the Shaping of Modern Black Identity

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Smithsonian Books #ad - A richly illustrated commemoration of African Americans' roles in World War I highlighting how the wartime experience reshaped their lives and their communities after they returned home. This stunning book presents artifacts, medals, and photographs alongside powerful essays that together highlight the efforts of African Americans during World War I.

. Together their efforts laid the groundwork for later advances in the civil rights movement. We return fighting reminds readers not only of the central role of African American soldiers in the war that first made their country a world power. It also reveals the way the conflict shaped African American identity and lent fuel to their longstanding efforts to demand full civil rights and to stake their place in the country's cultural and political landscape.

We Return Fighting: World War I and the Shaping of Modern Black Identity #ad - Black veterans' work during the conflict--and the respect they received from French allies but not their own US military--empowered them to return home and continue the fight for those rights. The book also presents the work of black citizens on the home front. As in many previous wars, black soldiers served the United States during the war, but they were assigned to segregated units and often relegated to labor and support duties rather than direct combat.

Indeed this was the central paradox of the war: these men and women fought abroad to secure rights they did not yet have at home in the States.

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Standing at Armageddon: A Grassroots History of the Progressive Era

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - A consistently engrossing, occasionally irreverent, always smoothly written history of America's painful entry into the modern age. Kirkus reviewsstanding at armageddon is a comprehensive and lively historical account of America's shift from a rural and agrarian society to an urban and industrial society.

Nell irvin painter will be featured in the PBS multipart series The Progressive Era with Bill Moyers, which coincides with the release of the updated edition of this acclaimed work.

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Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry, 1930-1950

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University of New Mexico Press #ad - These rank-and-file activists skillfully managed union affairs, including negotiating such benefits as maternity leave, company-provided day care, and paid vacations--in some cases better benefits than they enjoy today. Quickly it became the seventh largest CIO affiliate and a rare success story of women in unions.

Thousands of mexican and mexican-American women working in canneries in southern California established effective, democratic trade union locals run by local members. Particularly useful to readers interested in women's history, labor history, or Mexican-American culture. Journal of the southwest"i know of no more vivid or more convincing portrait of women's work culture than in Cannery Women, Cannery Lives.

Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry, 1930-1950 #ad - . Out of the labor militancy of the 1930s emerged the United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing, and Allied Workers of America UCAPAWA. First rate. Pacific historical review "cannery Women, Mexican women's lives, enhances our understanding of labor politics, Cannery Lives, and immigrant family history. Women have been the mainstay of the grueling, seasonal canning industry for over a century.

It is particularly valuable because it adds complexity to our perspectives on Mexican-origin women in the American experience.

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Reconstruction Updated Edition: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-18 Harper Perennial Modern Classics

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Harper Perennial Modern Classics #ad - This "smart book of enormous strengths" Boston Globe remains the standard work on the wrenching post-Civil War period—an era whose legacy still reverberates in the United States today. Reconstruction chronicles the way in which Americans—black and white—responded to the unprecedented changes unleashed by the war and the end of slavery.

From the "preeminent historian of reconstruction" New York Times Book Review, the prize-winning classic work on the post-Civil War period that shaped modern America. Eric foner's "masterful treatment of one of the most complex periods of American history" New Republic redefined how the post-Civil War period was viewed.

Reconstruction Updated Edition: America's Unfinished Revolution, 1863-18 Harper Perennial Modern Classics #ad - It addresses the ways in which the emancipated slaves' quest for economic autonomy and equal citizenship shaped the political agenda of Reconstruction; the remodeling of Southern society and the place of planters, for a time, merchants, and small farmers within it; the evolution of racial attitudes and patterns of race relations; and the emergence of a national state possessing vastly expanded authority and committed, to the principle of equal rights for all Americans.

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The End Of Reform: New Deal Liberalism in Recession and War

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Vintage #ad - The end of reform shows how the liberalism of the early new Deal—which set out to repair and, if necessary, restructure America’s economy—gave way to its contemporary counterpart, which is less hostile to corporate capitalism and more solicitous of individual rights. Those origins, says alan brinkley, are paradoxically situated during the second term of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, whose New Deal had made liberalism a fixture of American politics and society.

Clearly and dramatically, brinkley identifies the personalities and events responsible for this transformation while pointing to the broader trends in American society that made the politics of reform increasingly popular. At a time when liberalism is in disarray, this vastly illuminating book locates the origins of its crisis.

The End Of Reform: New Deal Liberalism in Recession and War #ad - It is both a major reinterpretation of the New Deal and a crucial map of the road to today’s political landscape.

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Lynching: Violence, Rhetoric, and American Identity Race, Rhetoric, and Media Series

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University Press of Mississippi #ad - Since violence enacts an argument about citizenship, Ore construes lynching and its expressions as part and parcel of America’s rhetorical tradition and political legacy. Drawing upon newspapers, and memoirs, ore outlines the connections between what was said and written, official records, as well as critical race theory, the material practices of lynching in the past, and the forms these rhetorics and practices assume now.

From the 1880s onward, lynchings, she finds, denoted citizenship, manifested a violent form of symbolic action that called a national public into existence, and upheld political community. Grounded in Ida B. While victims of antebellum lynchings were typically white men, postbellum lynchings became more frequent and more intense, with the victims more often black.

Lynching: Violence, Rhetoric, and American Identity Race, Rhetoric, and Media Series #ad - Ore investigates lynching as a racialized practice of civic engagement, in effect an argument against black inclusion within the changing nation. Wells’s summation of lynching as a social contract among whites to maintain a racial order, at its core, Ore’s book speaks to racialized violence as a mode of civic engagement.

After reconstruction, american civic identity, lynchings exhibited and embodied links between violent collective action, and the making of the nation. Ersula J. In addition, the acclaimed exhibit without Sanctuary, effigies of Barack Obama, Ore ties black resistance to lynching, recent police brutality, and the killing of Trayvon Martin.

In doing so, she demonstrates how lynching functioned as a strategy interwoven with the formation of America’s national identity and with the nation’s need to continually restrict and redefine that identity.

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Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I

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Basic Books #ad - But those hopes soon deteriorated as germany's attack on France failed, Austria-Hungary's armies suffered catastrophic losses, and Britain's ruthless blockade brought both nations to the brink of starvation. The war shattered their societies, destroyed their states, and imparted a poisonous legacy of bitterness and violence.

A prize-winning, magisterial history of world War I from the perspective of the defeated Central PowersFor the Central Powers, the First World War started with high hopes for an easy victory. The central powers were trapped in the Allies' ever-tightening Ring of Steel. In this compelling history, alexander Watson retells the war from the perspective of its losers: not just the leaders in Berlin and Vienna, but the people of Central Europe.

Ring of Steel: Germany and Austria-Hungary in World War I #ad - A major reevaluation of the first World War, Ring of Steel is essential for anyone seeking to understand the last century of European history.

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